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Species Guide: Your Blogger


As a newbie blogger, I find the idea of any of you reading my (hopefully interesting) future ramblings without any context of who I am pretty strange, so to start, here's a simple, non-eloquent, possibly slightly awkward sounding introduction of your friendly naturalist, conservationist, and first class nature addict: Annabel.

Physical characteristics: 

  • long brown hair, good length for being thoroughly tangled by the wind when any considerable amount of time is spent outside. Has been known to contain leaves, mud and/or dried grass, much to disappointment of peers.
  • clothes often (always) comprised of those which can be made muddy at any moment, frequently already muddy
  • not in fact normally covered in meerkats, as above photo illustrates, however if it were an option, I wouldn't be wholly against it.
  • as a general rule, smiling, regardless of weather :)


Habitat: Small countryside town in Hertfordshire, England. Most often found extremely stressed and hence hiding in bedroom and/or escaping into the outdoors with two large golden retrievers, camera and notebook. Excellent at hiding, fieldwork and observing. Less good at remembering to bring a coat.

Behavioural characteristics: 


  • extremely busy, potentially resulting in neglect of blog, but I will do my very best not to let that happen
  • gets extremely excited whenever the phrases 'did you see that' or 'hey I found out this amazing fact the other day' are mentioned. Is proud of this response.
  •  has surprisingly impressive set of field skills and mountain-craft for someone whose slightly skewed sense of balance has them fall over fairly often
  • knows a remarkable amount about odd subjects, such as the phylogenetic  history of whales. Completely fascinated by sea anemones and tardigrades.
  • loves to learn, write, and be in the outdoors 

Aspirations: Frankly, very much hopes that at least one person out there enjoys anything I post.

I feel we're quite introduced now. Welcome :) 









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